Skip to main content

tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  July 1, 2016 2:47am-4:05am EDT

2:47 am
2:48 am
keeping a close eye on the situation and i'm happy to
2:49 am
arrange a meeting between him to talk about what more can be done. >> statement, the prime minister. thank you, mr. speaker. with permission of that to make a statement on yesterday's european council. this is the first council since britain decided to leave the european union. the decision was expected and we begin discussions about how to ensure a strong relationship between britain and the countries of the european union. before the discussion on britain, a number of other items on the agenda. i migration the council noted the very significant reductions in illegal crossings from turkey to greece as a result of the agreement did with turkey in march but it expressed continued to turn up at the central mediterranean reared and determination to combat people smuggling by bolivia. britain plays a leading role with h. and s. enterprise and i can tell the house today would
2:50 am
also be deployed to stop the flow of weapons to terrorists, particularly in libya. i made up, secretary general stoltenberg gave a presentation ahead of the summit and the council agreed to meet for nato in the e.u. to a together in a complementary way to strengthen security. there are important commitments on the digital single market including the e.u. residents will travel to the digital content they purchase or subscribe to at home. the economic situation president of the bank gave a presentation in light of the outcome of our referendum. private-sector forecasts discussed included estimates of a reduction in eurozone growth between .3% 10.5% over the next three years. one of the main explanations as to predict a slowdown in the u.k. economy given our trade with the euro area. president drug he reassured the council the ecb has worked for many months to prepare for
2:51 am
insurgency and in the face of volatility, institutions will monitor markets and act as necessary. returning to the main discussions about britain leaving the e.u., the tone of the meeting was one of sadness and regret. there was an agreement the decision of the british people should be respect. we had positive discussions about the relationship we want to see between britain and european partners in the next steps leaving the e.u. including issues that need to be worked through an attachment for trickery and article l. let me say a word about each. we were clear while britain is leaving the european union, we are not turning back from europe and they are not turning backs on us. many counterparts talk warmly about the history and values our country shared in a huge contribution britain has made for peace and progress in europe. the prime minister described how the data helped to secure the independence of the country a century ago. the czech prime minister czech prime minister paid tribute at a home or persecution. many countries of eastern and central europe express the debt
2:52 am
of soda bread for standing by us suffered under communism and supporting them as they join the european union. the president talked about the visit he and i will be make you later this week to the battlefields were british and irish soldiers fight and die together for the freedom of our continent and defense of the democracy and values we share. the council was clear as we take toward the agenda of britain leaving the european union, we should want to have the closest possible relationship we can in the future. this should include the strongest possible relationship in terms of trade, corp. and security, something that only becomes more important in the appalling terrorist attack in turkey last night. as i said on monday, customer to implement the will of the british people, we have a fundamental responsibility to bring our country together. we will not tolerate hate crime or any attacks against people in our country because of ethnic
2:53 am
origin and i reassure the european leaders concerned about what they heard was happening in britain. we are proud multifaith multiethnic society will stay that way. the next steps leaving the e.u., first a lot of reassurance until britain believes we are a full member. we are entitled to the benefits of membership and full participation until the point at which we believe. we discuss the issues which will need to be worked through. i explained in britain there is great concern about the movement of people and challenges controlling immigration as well as concerns about the issue of sovereignty. explain how these had come together. many european partners were clear that it is impossible to have the benefits of membership without the cost of membership and that is something the next prime minister is going to have to work through very carefully. on the timing of article l, there wasn't a great clamor for britain to trickery to straightaway. while there were one or two voices calling for this, the
2:54 am
overwhelming view was that we need to take some time to get this right. everyone wants to see a clear blueprint in terms of what britain thinks is right for future relationship with the e.u. as i explained on monday we are starting to work straight away with which will be led a new permanent secretary, oliver robins picking up but examine options and possibilities setting up costs and benefits of the next prime minister will have all the information they need with which to determine exactly the right approach to take and the right outcome to negotiate. the decisions that followed included the trickery are for the next prime minister in the council understood and was back to back. i don't get the secret i have discussion in brussels frustrating but despite that we can be proud of what we've achieved within a greater focus on job growth, cutting the e.u. budget real terms for the first time, reducing the burden of red tape on business for building
2:55 am
common positions on issues of national security such as sanctions to stop iran getting a nuclear weapon, standing up for russian aggression in galvanizing other countries to help with the beat written was taking in dealing with the bullet and sierra leone. we've shown how much more we haven't common with neighbors and allies and friends to share fundamental values. it's a poignant reminder well poignant reminder while we would leave the european union, we must work together for the security and prosperity of people for generations to come and i commend this statement to the house. >> jeremy corbin. thank you, mr. speaker. i would like to thank for the advance copy of the statement and the e.u. council summit. i was very pleased to take a more conciliatory tone in relation to european neighbors and nigel barash did in the european parliament yesterday. as we negotiate our exit, the
2:56 am
people rely on a government to facilitate the positive transition as possible. if we are to achieve this, we must proceed in a concert of indecent manner. i look for to join in the prime minister and the commemoration on friday. this right to emphasize the role in negotiating agreement with iran to secure the support for actions that the ebola crisis in sierra leone. i thank the prime minister for that. yesterday the prime minister said at the summit that in order to strengthen the relationship, european leaders would have to offer the u.k. more control over immigration. the threat of losing access to a single market means we'd already see a negative effect on investments in business in this country. on monday, the prime minister said access was impossible. does the prime minister now believe that written can negotiate an unprecedented deal.
2:57 am
can he spell out more clearly what further discussions were held in this area. this is an issue in which they made to be an open debate. dare i say an open straight talking debate but absolutely fails much of the referendum campaign. the prime minister's state in the house on monday that article li not be triggered until it accessories in place. i heard fraser said about the views of other leaders at the summit, when does he expect article lii b. triggers so we will know what the negotiating timetable is. as i raced to my response to the prime minister monday, we in the house have a duty to act in the national interest to ensure the best agreement for all of our constituents. as the prime minister feel without the structures in place for the house to debate the alternatives and lead a discussion in our community, there is the risk of leaving britain in a state of paralysis at a time when people need clear
2:58 am
answers to concern. what he also appealed to tell us any further thought about the role of default governments in future negotiations with the european union. we see today the first mr. scott in creating her own separate negotiating group has started talks with the e.u. and it appears the minister of gibraltar is doing the same also. what conversations has the prime minister had with the first ministers and scott and anne wilson what legal advice is received on separate negotiations by default administrations and indeed overseas territories. i welcome his commitment and we will continue to play its part in operation sophia. last week's vote to leave the e.u. means this country is currently in an unstable position. the next steps we make we take our most important and must be taken with care. we have a duty not to reshaping rebuild an economy for the future. one that protects social
2:59 am
employment rates and builds policies on trade, migration, environmental protection and delivery country in which prosperity we create is shared by all. i urge the prime minister whoever his successor may be that when the economy needs now is a clear ground for investment , not further austerity cuts to public services. that's the chance to put forward yesterday. i also asked the prime minister in his successor when my time to look at the suspension and determination of his mouth even more good fiscal rule. i thank the prime minister for the assurance that same condemnation he gave of recent attacks and abuse wherever they occur in this country and i join him in that. we all need to calm our anchorage and time across all price of this house condemned the arrest of racism within our society. lilly also reiterate absolutely
3:00 am
his assurance to european union nationals working here, providing support and health service in so many other services that they are welcome and that they remain welcome for the work and contribution they make? our country is divided so we must heal our division. our economy is fragile so we must begin to rebuild it. our duty is to now move forward in a calm manner to build a new relationship with europe and build it written that works for everyone in every part of this country. >> prime minister. >> me think of right honorable gentleman for his odds in the way he's gone about it. constructive is the correct word. i was pleased that the discussions last night did not get off to a tone of european union countries demanding that set of actions. britain's arguing there is a mature and calm understanding that we need each other.
3:01 am
we need this negotiation to proceed well. we need to have a good outcome in our interests. i think it's gotten off on the right foot and i'll do everything i can weather in this job are as a big bench mp to make sure we keep the strong relationships with european partners as for going to need to. on this issue of immigration versus single market, he is right. this is frankly the biggest and most difficult issue to deal with frankly whether you're in the european union as we've been arguing for changes or whether you're out of the european union tried to scare the best possible access to the single market. my answer to the problem was to bring in the welfare restrictions that i negotiated, which were incredibly tough to negotiate. i'm sad this has now fallen away because of the referendum decision. there's no doubt the next government will work hard at this and i personally think that access to the single market and strength of our economy is the single most important issue they
3:02 am
have to deal with. on the issue of article l, it's a matter for the next prime minister in a very good reason for that, which is before you go into the tunnel of the article l negotiations which have a two-year time limit from the one to have made the best possible preparations for the blueprint you want to achieve at the end and do hope the other european countries understand that we are shooting for. you said no negotiation without notification. i don't have that excludes discussions of the new prime minister can have with partners or indeed that the institutions that we continue to get up on the right foot and that is the stronger price i would give to them. in terms of the institutions that had deputy first ministers in northern ireland, continue to do so. i want my voice voices to be heard loud and clear. this is a u.k. decision made by
3:03 am
the united kingdom government and united kingdom parliament and it has to be done in that way. i'm what he said about racism, we should all reiterate statements lead reiterate statements we've made to e.u. nationals here. thank them for their contribution, say the rates are guaranteed in the e.u. would work even harder i am sure for all contenders in the conservative leadership campaign and make clear that they want to safeguard the rights of people who work here instead to hear from the european union for the future. finally, what he says about the fiscal rule, does fail like a stuck record. whatever the problem, whatever the issue come the dancers were fired, more spending, more taxes and more debt. you don't get investment in the stew of economics ability and you don't have economic stability if you don't have a plan dealing with your debts and deficits. this has been proved the world
3:04 am
over 30 favorite countries like venezuela. i would argue not to go down that route. >> sir william cash. thank you, mr. speaker. my right honorable friend quite rightly has referred to trading corporation with the european union. we've always argued from the side. when my friend give us some further talking about very precise blueprints and is also talking about alternative models. will he give us an absolute assurance that in charge models are blueprints will be exclusively based on the assumption that we are repealing the european act of 1972. >> they are leaving the european union, so surely that must be the case. i have not seen there are only four or five blueprints and britain has to follow any one of those. obviously we can try and amend
3:05 am
blueprints and have norway plastered our a- or a better trade deals and canada. i think what is important for colleagues in the house to understand is there are fundamental questions about whether you want full access with a single market and the price he might have to pay a return to that or whether you're satisfied to have lasted all access another compensating advantages. the more we can attach facts and figures, the more people can make an informed choice. thank you, mr. speaker. since the prime minister has returned from brussels for the first time in 40 years, member states and the rest of the e.u. are still there discussing the future of europe. by the prime minister not a brussels, scotland's first tourist in brussels. his comeback to protect scotland's interest in europe in reserve our places in europe. she's not what the president of
3:06 am
the european commission and the president of the european parliament. also meeting with one of the key european negotiators on the prime minister of belgium. the first minister is also spoken and will be meeting of diplomats from other e.u. member states. nicola sturgeon as soon as a mandate from the scottish parliament including the labor party, but both democrats and the scottish green party. an expert group has been established with nice protecting their place in europe including imminent diplomat, economist and constitutional experts. these include the european court of justice, former british ambassador to nato, former economic adviser to the european commission and the under secretary of the commonwealth office. all of us need to work through for ways to protect the relationship at the european
3:07 am
union. our place in the single market and the social employment and economic benefits that come from that. as the prime minister, mr. speaker, whether the prime minister race accounts of menace areas. did he even raised scotland at the council of ministers? did he say scott wants to stay in the european union? did he say that gibraltar wants to stay in the european union? did he say that london wants to protect its important position in europe? when are we going to get some leadership on this from the u.k. government or is he just going to stand by and watch england leave the european union and england declared independence from the rest of the united kingdom. >> yes, there is a meeting of the 27 other members of the european union this morning that that was always going to happen if we were going to make decision to leave because as we
3:08 am
must prepare a negotiating position, they want to prepare their spirit of the thing is that caught off on a very reasonable, fair and constructive basis. what i featured the right honorable gentleman, i'm glad the first minister of scotland is having these meetings. it's always useful to meet and talk with european counterparts. at the end of the day, the best way we secure the best possible access for scotland in the single market is for the united kingdom to negotiate as hard as they can as one and answer very specific questions about whether i talked about how that last night. yes, i did. talked about this parliament, scotland. the way we manage to last nights meeting, we took a bit of a cue from what happens in this house as i sat out what i call the result of the referendum was and why. i set out what i blueprints and united kingdom seems would be. i explain how different parts of the united kingdom voted adult 27 other members of.
3:09 am
at the end of the dinner, i answered all their questions than i do in this house when mr. speaker as fully as sacred. a little bit of british parliamentary practice was introduced and it's a good way of doing things. >> very good for the european council as well. ..
3:10 am
>> i did emphasize it's a uk decision but also the united kingdom will want to listen very carefully to all of the constituent nations into these other ministers and parliaments in setting up negotiation we want to carry on. as for this issue of free movement of people that were before the next prime minister and government and parliament to decide but i in no doubt that this is a difficult issue. it's a difficult issue inside the eu were you of all the ability to change things. it will be even more difficult for outside if you want access to the single market to secure change. but nevertheless, that's the challenge. i explain that was my reasoning of the referendum. it was this coming together, concerned about free movement combined with a sense of control and sovereignty and i was reset as the result are i think economic case for state and was very strong but if we want to make this work whether out or and we are to listen to people
3:11 am
and try and find a way through this. >> the prime minister, thank you for statement and wonder whether his discussion yesterday is he aware of the growing mood among heads of government across the european union, but given three quarters of the youngest people of britain voted to remain in europe, they should be permitted as far as possible to remain in europe. what can be done to make sure young people are allowed access to europe even over and above those of the rest of us? is the aware of the great concern amongst many communities depend upon european funding, most importantly i would say britain's farmers? many of whom are deeply concerned at the loss of payment at some point in the next three years. can't he make a guarantee today to british farmers will continue to have direct payment to keep them in business even after we leave the european union, if we
3:12 am
do? >> first of all on young people i think he's right that people want to those opportunities to work and to travel into study. one of the things the eu unit wanted to do is to work out the precise nature of the agreement like what access within have to them from the outside of the european union to on the issue of funding the european budget is set up between 2014-2020 including the amount of money for coastal farmers. what i can guarantee while we are in those payments continued and contracts will be honored but will be for a future government to become at the point of departure what payments we should continue to make to our farmers. if it was me, ma i'm keen to the living working countryside but will have to go through the options and future partners will have to decide your. >> does the prime minister agree unanimously taken the other four affairs committee that the construction of article 50 means that it is perfectly like he that there will be no agreement
3:13 am
on the other side of agreement regarding to envy from our partners and agreement of european parliament at the end of the two years? and that would mean though that we would still have access to the single market but we would be subject to world trade organization most favored nation drones. since that would mean that is no freedom of the people and we would not be paying into the budget, that would represent a perfectly sound by one foot united kingdom in the negotiation? and could the prime minister under this likely vote that other advances will be made on that before we arrived at the deeper coverage of free trade agreement and could the prime minister also say, just tells about the fate of the british president next year, we will be a full member? >> we will be hearing from them very, very regularly given the a lot of positioned ideals. prime minister.
3:14 am
>> i did look at the fort affairs select committee report, and while i'm not fully liberated and able to say what i think, i thought that the conclusions were -- [laughter] spent i was thinking of a place in london, but i won't go there. [laughter] so if we leave the eu and we have no deal in place, the tariffs offer things like 10% on cars, 12% on clothes, 36% on some very produce. this is not a good outcome for the united kingdom. we will look at the committee as we get issued up and running and look at the alternatives, but i really think that is not a good outcome for the united kingdom. [inaudible] >> thank you, mr. speaker.
3:15 am
that i thank the prime minister for service to this country, for his support for northern ireland and the northern island executor and very difficult time and also support the united kingdom in which him and his family very best wishes for the future. on the issue of the summit came the prime minister spell out again not least to reassure our european partners, our commitment to nato and our european partners who are now speaking somewhat ill of our decision last thursday, should be reminded that the uk is one of the main contributors to nato come as a firm supporter of european defense and security and that they should play a greater role in stepping up to contributing to europeans defense along with the americans and ourselves? so in all of this the wider perspective needs to be looked at, the u.s. imported single market at nato into fits of security of europe not least in particulaparticularly in regarde aggression of russia needs to be
3:16 am
borne in mind very, very strongly. >> i want to thank him for his kind remarks. he's right our commitment to nato continues. i think is also right that our spending being 2% of our national output is now responsible for a very large share of the overall european commitment and we should be encouraging others to increase their spending. we need to make sure that our membership of nato continues and we are not disadvantaged by being in one and out of the other. >> thank you, mr. speaker. my right honorable friend consistently made the case to british colleagues, indeed he made a last appeal to the country from birmingham which is much appreciated. we agreed that reciprocity between the uk and eu seattle give protecting hundreds and thousands of children which depend on the access, the principal market? >> i'm very grateful to what my right honorable friend says that
3:17 am
anyone who thinks that isn't something of a manufacturing renaissance taking place should go to that plant, that jaguar plan. seven or eight years ago there were 4000 people. you are now 14,000 people there and it's not just manufacture and assembly. it is designed. it's r&d, technology, that is taken literally of hundreds of apprentices ever you. is a magnificent car plant and is something we want to see more of. i think it's crucial for companies like that would keep the european market open and we keep companies like that investing in our country rather than investing in countries inside the european. that is an alternate for the other think that's the importance of maintaining every store access to the single market. >> there's a difference between future reform and existing residents. prime minister said earlier we could confirm residency or
3:18 am
employment rights for eu citizens who live here already until negotiations were under way. why is that the case? given this is being exploited by awful go home campaigns or repatriation campaigns. surely we should take a firm stand against this and pass some swift motion or legislation on immigration rule in this house before the summer recess to put an end to that speculation, provide reassurance to eu citizens who may have worked here for very many years. i urge you to consider this because i think this would be a wise decision. >> i listen very carefully to what she says. i try to answer the question asked i could and as i could and as legally as they can because of course as we go into this negotiation, if we come out of the negotiation of a for instance, it will be a future government but arguing for visa requirements or restrictions on numbers or quotas or work permit
3:19 am
or whatever for european nationals to come here, other countries might take action against british citizens trying to go and travel and work and live in other countries. i think even if that were to happen i think the answer i'm sure would be to guarantee the status of anybody here now, and we can say that while we are in the european union but i think it is for future prime minister to make that decision. >> really understand that negotiations will be protected on the economic issues. the last years have seen a big improvement in terms of our cooperation, automatic cooperation on security, both formal and informal meetings. i can't see that should be much of a way of negotiating process. surely to make sense to ensure that those formal and informal meetings continue both in terms
3:20 am
of dealing with terrorism but also dealing with economic ties spent i think he puts it through. there's a number of informal mechanisms that have grown up including the counterterrorism group of countries, mostly european union meeting very high level of our intelligence and secret services that are also quite a lot of now growing mechanisms within the eu such as the information system, the watch lists that are for people traveling between european union countries, some of which are bound very much in the eu institution and rules. people can rules. people are like that are not like that but the fact is that they exist and we had to work out of how to maintain access to as much of that as possible in terms of our national security. >> could the prime minister explained to the millions of people who voted to leave why in the next few months while we wait for a new prime minister, this country --
3:21 am
[inaudible] all the professional they've got start talking and negotiating and formally perhaps with candidate come with australia, with malaysia to all the other countries who would be desperately keen to sign up to agreementagreement s with why can we not do some of these things? and if we are still paying into the union, are we still not going to send it to having signed every field director that comes through the next two years? >> first of all on the point about canada, australia, of course we can start those conversations. i think it's difficult to start full on trade negotiations because entering a relationship between britain and the european union single market i think it's quite difficult to get into an intensive discussion but you can have some pathfinder discussions. on the issue of directives i think we have to be clear, we are members of this organization. we pay in and i continues until the day we leave and, therefore, think we have to obey the rules
3:22 am
and laws just as we would expect other european union countries not to suddenly not obey the rules with respect to us. i think that's important. i think in terms of decisions that need to be made right now, the are those that have to be made for legal and practical reasons. there may be some decisions that can be put off for a month or two in order to have a new government that can think of in the context of the renegotiation but i don't wish to do anything to break the law. >> whilst we are naturally focused on our future role in europe, our friends in the baltic nations are concerned about the immediate risks across the border. military and also arrive at space and my right honorable friend knows quite well. easy more satisfied that all the candidate is being done both within nato but also within the european union, to stand by our friends? >> i think my friend makes a good point to yes, i think
3:23 am
enough is being done to we also have a summit coming up where we will be part of the plane a big role in making sure that are visible military presences in baltic states, we would be point our part and americans will be playing theirs. i think it's important we keep up that reassurance because for them this is the absolute key thing that britain brings to their security. >> -- [inaudible] i did not see the prime minister there. so i kept telling the most popular -- [inaudible] anuniversities have benefited greatly. what can the prime minister and this government and the future
3:24 am
government do to make sure that funding or some funding is a secure? >> obviously i wasn't there because i was in brussels at the time. while i'm all for having your cake and eat it, i haven't been able to get how to be at two places at the same time. look, i think i said what i can say about funding for university. it's important to make it through the european union under the program while we are a member. we will support our universities. he and i have to be frank with each other that whales actually did not vote remain in the european union. in spite of the fact whales is a net beneficiary, welsh farming couple out of your. i think the welsh steel industry will do far better if we are in rather than a. i take my share of responsibility that we didn't win this campaign. we've all got to think about how we, even now that we're leaving make better arguments about how britain can remain as engaged as
3:25 am
possible. >> thank you, mr. speaker. can i think the prime minister not just for statement today but for all his work that he's in over the six years to protect uk. with respect to the meetings yesterday did my right honorable friend detect any regret on the part of other eu leaders, that they did not make more concessions when he sought to renegotiate our membership the? >> a very good question and one i'm kind of can-do edge of the sense and the european council was that they have really bent over backwards to give a country that already had a special status out of the euro, things that they found profoundly uncomfortable. many of those countries really do believe an ever closer political union. they hated the thing to bring right, you are out of this.
3:26 am
that really painted them but they did it. they take to dislike having to agree to cut welfare benefits for their own citizens because that is essential what they signed up to do. i believe and will always believe it was a good negotiation. it didn't solve all of britain's problems but it certainly address some of the biggest concerns the british people had. and i would say that i always want to know whether there's more that could've been done. that very strong sense i get into this issue awful access to the single market and reformed f free movement is very, very difficult to we achieved some reforms but i think the idea there is an enormous change to free movement, particularly perhaps from outside the eu, i think is a very, very tough call. people have to think through that very carefully before we get into negotiation.
3:27 am
>> give them the very grave damage that is already being done to our economy because of the uncertainty, would he call on all those in this house to lead this country to keep britain in the single market with full access? >> i think the honorable gentleman makes a very important point i think this is one of the key arguments. when i examined what i've always believed we are bette better ofn can't even though i wanted to see reform, to me it's always come down to this comes a single market exists where into it will go on existing even if we leave it and it has about the effect on our economic and business and political and national life. so i would certainly urge my colleagues to want to aim for the greatest possible access but obviously they will have to think about what the benefits and this benefits of that route are. >> does the prime minister accept that wind negotiating with the eu we should remember our many strengths? one of the strongest economies,
3:28 am
many competitive advantages would more than compensate for any tears which the wto will ensure cannot be punitive even if they were imposed while nations around the world are already including australia, including new zealand are already knocking at our door with regard to trade deals? >> no one is more impressed by the strength of the british economy than me. i think it is strong. it's got many advantages, many key industries that are admired the world over. and we have to recognize its going to be hard and difficult negotiations in many ways because we are negotiating with a block of 440 million people. but sort of we should make the most of our strength. i think this idea that terrorists can be compensated for in other ways is quite dangerous talk to if you think about the car company and others who invested a want to come and invest year and then pay tariffs. i think they are all on the
3:29 am
whole to be avoided. >> this campaign undoubtedly made -- [inaudible] the evolving exposed accordingly. but coming back to the issue which has been raised a number of occasions today, does not somewhat responsible for the result live with the eu leadership, the way in which they show no effect whatsoever? my part which have the honor to represent, the issue of the free movement. eu law, it will come down to 10 commandments. >> for once i have great sympathy with the honorable gentleman. that is why i chose to aim at this issue by saying people could come here and work but they couldn't get full accept our welfare system for four years. i think that address the concern his constituents have and my constituents have about there should be something for nothing. the point we have to understand is that european union countries
3:30 am
see the single market as consisting not only of the free movement of goods, people, services and capital, they see those bound together but they also see the single market include the payment of the country back into the eu to strengthen the weakest members of those that are recent recovered from communism. and, of course, one can try and negotiate amendments to these movements, and i did, but one has to think about that mindset as we go into negotiation. >> the prime minister will be aware that the voter to vote in the eu, many of our businesses rely on a single market. many of my constituents work in london in insurance, financial services and legal work. does he agree that part of this negotiation must be about the passport arrangement which has tabled the service interest to do so well?
3:31 am
i don't know if it's mentioned at the european council but i want to thank him for everything he has done. >> i think this is your passport in is going to loom very large for the reason financial services 7%, two-thirds of the jobs are outside london. we are the financial center for europe, 40% of financial services in europe. as we will be strong in the area whatever the outcome but it is untrue the passport does help britisbritish firms and it helpr countries firms come to bring the one of the reasons the swiss banks are here in such large measure is they don't get passporting rights as switching the it is one of the issues about what access the single market actually means. >> thank you very much, mr. speaker. coat i thank the prime minister for all his efforts? does he agree with me though to be fully recognize the very
3:32 am
difficult position northern ireland, we voted tuesday. we want to stay, yet we are hostage to mistakes of others who were misled by false promises. unlimited funding for images and farmers. does he recognize that northern ireland would need to open up opportunities to protect their interests and obtain a close relationship with europe can't to protect, has he time to give any thought, -- the good friday accord is undermined by much of legislation that hinges on the eu? >> obviously we'll look at the specific questions he raises closely. that's something official in northern ireland and westminster can start with straight away. but i want us to get all the benefits we've had from the common travel area and i think what we'll have is the closest possible cooperation with the government of the republic of ireland. a very moving speech about how
3:33 am
britain and ireland have been fighting a just i think he said since 1169. i haven't checked out my dates but i think i've got that right. he then went through some of the key elements of, some of the key elements of the conflict in which i'm sure probably relevant will probably evolve but who knows? but pointed out on i'm proud, he says to dave relations between the united kingdom and ireland have never been stronger. we must not let that go. >> my constituency is a number of significant manufacturing and technology businesses. businesses play a major role in our local economy. what reassurance can be trained three give me that this trade -- prime minister -- trade will continue to grow speak with i think this goes back to the issue, i thank my friend for his remarks. this comes back to manufacturing annexes to the single market.
3:34 am
i think this loom so large in negotiation. nothing changes for the next probably two years at least while this negotiation carries on but we need to make sure as the come out at the end of that article 50 process that we have this access to proper situps or manufactures know what they are doing. >> can i think the prime minister for his strong condemnation of the attacks on the polish community and others? can i pay tribute to for the respect and commitment that he is shown to britain's ethnic minority community over the last six years? and, indeed, for creating the most diverse administration of any conservative prime minister in history. and respect to the summit yesterday was very discussion of the comments made by the mayor of -- or the french economy minister that the juxtaposed borders be taken out of friends and returned to united kingdom but does he agree that this is a deal made between britain and
3:35 am
france, at has nothing to do with the referendum? >> first of all let me thank him for his comments about my support for britain's minorities and the diversity we see on these benches. that has been very important. [inaudible] we didn't discuss last that the juxtaposed border control issue with remarks of the mayor of calais. this is between britain and france. we hope the french do but i i don't resolve printing a second referendum campaign about the risks there are. we need to redouble our efforts to try to make sure the borders remain where they are. >> can the prime minister confirm that the 100,000 migrants is about unlike some number of people that they are
3:36 am
willing to accept at the moment it's especially outside london and the home counties? >> i wouldn't put like that. the point of because i think we should have a sense of what the net migration should be. in a moderate advance world and immoderate defense country like britain you have often well over 100,000 to many hundred of thousand of british people in eu nationals here moving to europe or elsewhere. you have european nationals coming year. i think measuring in at number which is imprecise and difficult because people do for all different reasons is a good way of measuring the pressure on public services. go back to 2008, the number of people leaving the uk at the number of people arriving from europe was actually a little bit negative and that's what i've always focus on this net migration issue here. >> does he recognize whoever
3:37 am
becomes the next prime minister will have no mandate to negotiate on behalf of of the people of this country, not least because the campaign failed set out any serious plan what brexit looks like and, therefore, the clearest thing would to go for early general election? >> i would argue we are a parliamentary democracy and so the new prime minister in the cabinet should draw up a negotiating mandate based on the work the committed over the next few weeks and months to set out all the alternatives and they'll have to bring it here and defend and explain in this aspect that seems to me the right way forward. >> thank you, mr. speaker. formal negotiation will start when article 50 is taken but would he agree with me that our first piece of negotiating leverage is when we decide to go to article 50? there is no reason and that we've got the site month by month of what would happen if
3:38 am
the next 24 months? >> i think my honorable friend is right that clearly british decision when to trigger article 50. i think it's important to recognize that our european partners have concerns, too. the economic problems that we are currently suffering and may have moral or also second in the dutch prime minister said he thought his growth rate would be materially affected by the position in britain and the uncertainty. so i think given negotiations are yes, hard work and hard for us but to rely on a certain amount of goodwill. i think you don't want to put too much of that goodwill risk in terms of how you proceed. >> -- with a future trading position unknown. with the unity of the uk itself under threat and appalling racist attacks happening on our
3:39 am
streets, does the prime minister not agree as a response to the referendum, the setting up of the unit in the cabinet office under the number for west is simply not up to the task in response to what is, after all, the greatest change in britain's position in the world since the end of the second world war? >> first of all let me agree with him on the issue of racist attacks. when you take urgent action, in terms of the stephanie to take but there is i believe a limited amount that you can do before i knew prime minister and cabinet arrived but you shouldn't be little that because a lot of this is cold hard facts about what the different alternatives are and what the difference costs and benefits are. there's a world of difference between a referendum campaign where the league side were on all sorts of things that went with the new status, hypothetical status, know the real facts about those things look like. that actually something that needs to rethink the methods
3:40 am
we're putting in place will help with that. >> prime minister said we're taking all the benefits of membership until the point at which we live. can't i quantify his access to funding, created to safeguard a 10,000 jobs and 83 million pounds, as a long-term conditions -- [inaudible] >> what i can say is any contract entered into before britain leads the eu should be honored in full in terms of eu funding for research or four regions of our country. the status we have with respect to the eib will have to be determined as part of the negotiation but again that's a technical issue that a widely unit can look at now and see what the options are so we can
3:41 am
discuss them in this house. >> thank you, mr. speaker. they have recently wiped much of the -- and removed a key point that made during the campaign promise. i disagree with many of the claims made, but does the prime minister agree with me that the public will never forgive politicians to form part of the new government if they now break those pledges? there will be no hiding place and still be held to account on those overblown promises in the next government. >> one thing we all experience and share in this house is that when we make commitments and promises, we are held to account for them. in this house that is discussed botches -- dispatch boxes. i would say long may that remains the case.
3:42 am
>> the renegotiations will clearly be difficult and take some time, but one area where we must take action now is improving the jobs, skills and infrastructure in our market, towns and coastal areas where many people feel they haven't seen the benefits of growth. so can ask the prime minister to work with local council leaders to make sure that devolution deals being struck across the country deliver for these areas and not just at great metropolitan cities? >> i think she makes an important point, not only do pledges fight are 3 million apprentices actually help address the issue of immigration, because that means training of our own people but they also offer hope and help to our regional economies that attaches is not just the city economy. we should continue with all the deals. they are popular with local authority leaders. they have real teeth and we will
3:43 am
carry on with that work. >> thank you, mr. speaker. prime minister, northern ireland voted to remain within the european union. my constituency which is a border constituency -- [inaudible] and particularly depend on free access to goods, services but the essential access to markets for 46% of what the export and import comes from the south of ireland. out economy depends on membership of the european union. how can that be guaranteed? >> the vote in northern ireland was very, very strong you know, not least respecting the fact that the part of the first minister wanted to leave the european union. very strong statement i would argue that all of the constituent parts of medicaid in need to make their voice heard.
3:44 am
that i think this process over the next few months of drawing up the different blueprints is an important opportunity to influence debate in this country and to benefit of the injured about what the outcome should be. the example she gives in terms of cross-border trade in northern ireland isn't a good example to inform this debate. >> -- the polish ukraine border taking part in the largest military exercises since the end of the cold war. he has committed 1000 british personnel to participate in nato's very high readiness for any that have been russian aggression, and the cease-fire in ukraine is on the brink of collapse. can i urge him to use his final appearance as a nato prime minister on the eighth and ninth of the warsaw summit to urge all of our european colleagues to continue to press for sanctions against putin's russia and not to give in to russia's aggression in ukraine? >> i think she's right.
3:45 am
we've done a lot to reassure on our polish and baltic friends and allies that is why the troops taking part in this exercise. we are taking a lead role in this conference. we are going to make sure we provide visible the troops. hours will be stationed in estonia. i think america on countries will be taking on the other baltic states. so that people can see that window looked over these borders they don't just see us to the troops or latvia trips. they see british troops are american troops of french troops i think that is absolutely right. >> mr. speaker, several weeks ago in the lead up to the referendum i asked for the personal commitment -- prime minister gave a full commitment to since the referendum we have heard comments from suggested from scotland that may be in doubt due to a new tory leadership in the near future. what i would like to ask is can
3:46 am
he reassure that this cd will be delivered in terms of funding regardless of who will be the prime minister or the prime minister in the near future of? >> i can't find fans of my successor but i will say to any of the candidates that the city deals have been a great success throughout the 19 at i think it has been quite a marketing that actually, although scotland now has a powerhouse parma they have popular and successful whether being tried in scotland and no make that clear. >> on the wto a canadian staff free trade agreement, clearly wouldn't be the best possible deal for our country but i think it is irresponsible of some of the leading league campaigners to suggest during the campaign that i was somehow a good alternative to our membership. but isn't it also clear from what european leaders said both in february, and yesterday, that if his successor prioritizes stopping free movement in light of the referendum that we will
3:47 am
not have the same unfettered access to the single market? the parameters of the toys are pretty clear. >> i think she makes a strong point. and i can add to it by saying one of the things although is a relatively successful meeting yesterday, it is what point out that a canada free trade deal is not yet agreed. that our countries in the eu data getting very nervous about free trade deals. i happen to think they are wrong but i think that is worth bearing in mind. but what she says about access to the single market, if that's the most important thing, there are trade-offs you have to consider and that's the way i would see this negotiation. >> thank you, mr. speaker. denmark voted in a referendum to reject the treaty. a year later they voted and a second referendum to accept it.
3:48 am
in the fine european traditions of keeping voting until you get the right results. result. we know that many millions of people in this country felt they were deceived by the exaggerations and allies and the campaigns of both parties, and they now feel themselves cheated by that result, and millions of people are protesting. isn't it right that we look again at the possibility of a second referendum in this uncertainty that all second calls are always superior to first thoughts of? >> i think we're to accept the result and i'm not planning a second referendum. what we have to focus on is it the closest possible relationship between britain and your. we can start to work in shaping the debate. we can start that debate right now. >> i'm getting a bit bored with this lame duck attitude. take control.
3:49 am
a lot of things that he could still do. we could to pass emergency legislation to make it absolutely clear that every eu citizen that is living in this country now is entitled to live here and stay here into the future. that would stop some of the horrible and campaigning that is has been happening. he could set up a royal commission to make sure we bind together as much of the country as possible, both houses of parliament, and to start creating a consensus but what we should be lobbying for is the best deal in the future. why doesn't he take control? i thought that's what it was all about. >> i have to say to the right honorable gentleman, i've never believed you take control or take rapid decisions by setting up a commission. i think that is, as i said, they take minutes and the last for years about what would happen in this case. i will look very carefully at all these issues of how to reassure eu nationals batter he. i've tried to set out the legal
3:50 am
position and given the strongest possible condemnation. but i think frankly he and his colleagues have got something they need to take control of and its of their party. i think, well he did, you know -- [laughter] it is a topsy-turvy world. i've never felt greater support for my part and i'm leaving and i've never seen the opposition anwithout support, and he is staying. [laughter] as someone about to enter the political greater, perhaps i could misquote my favorite band and say let's meet at the cemetery gates. [laughter] >> thank you, mr. speaker. -- thinking of emigrating -- [inaudible] can the prime minister confirm that -- [inaudible]
3:51 am
>> what needs to happen is for negotiation to be completed. up until been the capital payments that are set out in 2014-2020 to continue and then a future government, the uk government but also now the scottish parliament with its powerhouse financial cost to decide the payments it wants to make to scottish parliament. >> thank you, mr. speaker. we and the prime minister got back from brussels last night, was there any message from the member about where to find the 350 million to the nhs? >> it was pretty late by the time i got back and it wasn't time for anything. >> i join you acknowledgments due to the prime minister. i don't really think he fully appreciates and certainly his secretary of state doesn't come that when we negotiated the good friday agreement, membership was taken as a given in the fabric
3:52 am
of that agreement. also at the core of that agreement is the principle of content. out of the people of northern ireland find that they've been dragged out of the european union against their consent. as express when they voted for the good friday agreement and has expressed in a referendum last week, sony 8.5% in my own constituency. can he say no to negotiations will take place will sort things out for us? is clear english politics doesn't have a ma map for wherew fight is over you is simply telling us that we have to tailgate with impulses and prejudice of english politics dragged to next the we need to get a better situation to protect the access and benefits of the eu for our constituents. >> i totally understand the honorable gentleman's passion about this, and he and i were on the same side. but my reading of the history of this is different, which is that the good friday agreement, based
3:53 am
on the principle of consent, was it that the united kingdom would continue to northern ireland would be part of the united kingdom. this is a sovereign decision for the united kingdom. now the job of the united kingdom government info collaboration with the first and deputy first ministers in northern ireland is to get the best possible negotiation and, therefore, northern ireland place so that relations north south can be a strong as they can. >> lord hill brings a european commission has decided to step down. as the prime minister in plans to appoint somebody if only on an interim basis speak with yes, i think we should appoint a new commissioner. we pay our dues in full but we should have a uk commission. commission. i discussed this yesterday with the president of the commission and we hope to come forward with a nomination shortly. >> mr. speaker, as a proud son of irish immigrants who encountered both sides no dogs and no irish, we once again see
3:54 am
fear stalk the streets. a polish women told to go home. the kashmiri driver told we don't want you muslims here. the aggressive individual is said to a train guard, don't you close those doors until i tell you, we make the rules and now. all of the consequence of xenophobia being put mainstream in the referendum campaign. does the prime minister agree with me that it can never be right that someone, because of the accident or the color of their skin, they should fear for their safety, and that we will never ever allow this great, dynamic, multicultural britain to be divided by the evil of racism? >> i agree with every word that the honorable gentleman has said. i never wanted to see those sentiments appear in our country again that i think the difference between now and the 1950s and '60s when these
3:55 am
things happen is the state of our laws is far stronger, the understanding of our police is far better, the ability for prosecuting authority to take action is much stronger and we need to make sure all those things are brought to bear. >> as far as the uk -- perhaps he should let the scottish government to host to the opinion you. but does he understand the concerns expressed by my constituents about the impact of breast on the front of relatives who are uk citizens that live in the eu, taken as regards access to health care and other social protections? how will this be maintained in the future? >> of course i understand people's passion a country. e-health did you see exact issue which didn't loom as large as i wish you would because i think there are some big retail benefits from being in the eu, the ability of mobile phones without roaming charges can the story of digital content, the acts of two health services, cheap airfare to i think it's the issue that it was a unit can
3:56 am
look at, what are the rules in terms of access to health care, what can you secure in europe but outside the european union? and started with a 42 people can what the future holds. >> 17% of those who voted last thursday voted to remain -- 70. hundreds have written to me since fitting for the jobs, stability of our local community where 50% are eu nationals or even their personal safety. what should i say this government is doing to reassure them? >> what i would hope he would say is rightly we have to accept the democratic will o of the people and a properly constituted a referendum vote on it six to one basis in the south but we should do everything we can to reassure people. first of all that hate crime has no place like we discussed today but didn't will conduct a negotiation based on the best available evidence about what we can do to achieve the closest possible relationship with europe on the basis of trade and cooperation and security.
3:57 am
that is our goal and help that will provide some reassurance but, of course, in any referendum debate with a decision like this there will be those who are disappointed by the result. myself included. we've got to now make the best weekend of the new situation we are in. >> mr. speaker, they already doggie economic have been fatally undermined did by the decision to withdraw from the european union. can i suggest i it is looking to salvage something of a legacy he pulls the plug on this enormous falling? >> the logic and the economics behind hinkley point see are that we need to have some base load noncarbon energy in order to have any ability to make a very challenging targets we have to reduce carbon emissions and our country. i am for addressing the massive expansion of renewable energy
3:58 am
since i've been prime minister. my favorite statistic is that 98% of britain's solar panels have been installed since i've had this job. but you do need solar power by nature an admin and you do need some base load power and that's why think the case for hinkley continues. >> thank you, mr. speaker. he might want to the presence of for the body my third try, i know it's over. [laughter] part of labour parties concerned there is a light and it never goes out. >> here, here. >> mr. speaker, in bristol on friday elected mirror convened a meeting of key stakeholder to try to work out what this means. clearly very many worthy people. can he assure us that the voice of the international stage will not be dimmed during this negotiation speak as i certainly would've a thing i can to stand up for bristol. i wa was interested the labour party was interested the labour parties favors long as there is
3:59 am
a light that never goes out because it involves a double suicide. i think the lyrics are if a double-decker bus crashes into us, there's a fine the way than by -- i think i think i'm right in saying. i'm not sure that's wholly reassuring to the front bench. i think the next verse is if a 10-ton truck crashes into us. [laughter] you try one after the other. you got inspiration elsewhere. spent i did not the prime minister has quite such compendious knowledge of popular music. [laughter] extraordinarily impressive. >> i'm not going to ask the prime minister remember anymore lyrics today, but he will have heard honorary members and white on the members from both sides of the house talk about imports of manufacturing to the midlands. and people have also have heard in prime minister us questions refer to the comments of saudi can't about london having a deep voice both in the preparation
4:00 am
for negotiation and the negotiation themselves. i absolutely agree with that but can he say something about the mechanisms he envisions to allow our reasons outside of london to have a say in preparation for negotiation and in negotiations itself? >> what i can say apparat unless in more detail for the house litigation is we need to find mechanisms. we have some already are listening to the constituent policy of united kingdom.
4:01 am
4:02 am
4:03 am
4:04 am
>> now education secretary testified before the senate health education labor and pensions committee produces an hour and 50 minutes.

5 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on